Legendary Mexican Regional band Los Tigres del Norte trying to keep it real at Kingsbridge Armory in the Bronx.

John Reilly/Courtesy of the artist


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John Reilly/Courtesy of the artist


Famous Mexican Regional band Los Tigres del Norte maintaining it serious at Kingsbridge Armory in the Bronx.

John Reilly/Courtesy of the artist

When I was a teenager, I used a summer playing drums with my uncle’s accordion conjunto, a compact group of guitar, bass, drums and, of program, an accordion. We played typical Mexican bar songs: cumbias, boleros and corridos…. plenty of corridos.

Today the document sector would refer to my uncle’s band as “Regional Mexican Songs”: it has its have Grammy and Latin Grammy groups there is an whole radio sector built close to the songs Regional Mexican Music is promptly outpacing reggaetón as the most streamed genre of Spanish-language songs and but, it is hardly observed outside of thousands and thousands of fans — mainly millennials and Gen Z listeners who have their eyes and ears on the future when reaching again to the traditions of their mother and father and abuelitos.

What is crucial to bear in mind is that “Mexican Regional” is a capture-all expression. Traditionally, accordions have been king as these types travelled north and south, so most of the conversations around this tunes are dominated by corridos and boleros executed in the norteño fashion. But a closer glimpse at the Billboard charts and streaming figures clearly show a curious mix of corridos and lure new music increasing from the streets of significant metropolitan areas with large Latinx and African American populations — searching at you, SoCal and Houston!

So if you believed Mexican Regional was the audio of your grandparents, tune in this week to see how your abuela may possibly be the hippest member of your familia.