“Total Transparency Filter (Portrait of N),” by art observe professor Stephanie Syjuco, is component of I AM…, an exhibition at San Francisco arts nonprofit Root Division. (Photograph by Graham Holoch, courtesy of Root Division)

At a San Francisco arts nonprofit called Root Division hangs a picture that Stephanie Syjuco took in 2017. It’s a portrait — or what appears to be a portrait — of a person covered in a semi-sheer checkered fabric. It is titled “Total Transparency Filter (Portrait of N).”

portrait of stephanie syjuco

At Berkeley, Syjuco teaches sculpture, pictures and social follow courses. This slide, she is training a course on zines and option publications. (Photograph by Kija Lucas)

“It’s a portrait of an undocumented pupil who, at the time, was below immediate menace of remaining detained or deported, centered on their documentation status,” reported Syjuco.

Syjuco, a professor in UC Berkeley’s Office of Artwork Apply, took the photo a 12 months immediately after Donald Trump was elected president. Undocumented pupils across the U.S. who experienced been equipped to attend college or university as component of Deferred Motion for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, instantly found themselves and the lives they experienced crafted in jeopardy.

Photographing her college student, who experienced lately graduated with an art observe diploma, below literal deal with, imagined Syjuco, would be a way to illustrate the contradictions the younger artist was experiencing in her each day lifestyle. On a person hand, she experienced to be concealed and not contact consideration to herself in get to conceal her undocumented standing. On the other hand, she experienced to stand out and be observed to start off a career and be a successful human being in modern society.

“I wanted to shoot a image that would each defend her identity and also explain the plan of having been disappeared, or all of a unexpected rendered invisible,” reported Syjuco.

Yellow billboard with silhouettes of a two parents and a child being reunited

“Reunite,” by Ronald Rael, chair of Berkeley’s Office of Architecture, and his partner, Virginia San Fratello, is also on display at Root Division. (Photograph by Graham Holoch, courtesy of Root Division)

The portrait is part of I AM…, an exhibition at Root Division curated by unbiased curator and editor Adrianne Ramsey that characteristics 15 artists, the greater part of whom are dependent in the Bay Location. The exhibited works, mentioned Ramsey, “respond critically to the idea that American identification is complicit and bound to patterns of violence and rampant discrimination.” Ronald Rael, chair of Berkeley’s Office of Architecture, and his spouse, Virginia San Fratello, are displaying their billboard “Reunite” (2018) there, and quite a few artwork observe alumni, together with Jear Keokham, Reniel Del Rosario and Andrew Wilson, also have works on show.

Syjuco mentioned that even even though our govt has a new administration, it doesn’t indicate that our state is all of a sudden safe for immigrants or other individuals who really do not fit an exclusionary design of what an American is — center class and of European ancestry.

“These difficulties are longstanding,” she mentioned, “like racism and the absence of various illustration in governmental coverage and support buildings. They did not just go away. The xenophobic guidelines harnessed through the previous 4 many years weren’t an anomaly. There are continue to items that we have to have to maintain talking from to present the range and complexity of who counts in America.”

To look at the exhibition I AM…, which runs via Aug. 14, e mail go [email protected] to timetable an appointment.