Visible artists Lisa Bergh and Andrew Nordin of New London, Minn., not too long ago took an artwork-themed road trip that provided a prevent at the Nemeth Artwork Center in Park Rapids, Minn. and the T. L. Solien show “See the Sky.”

Solien’s huge scale paintings captivated them. They described the drama of his modern day function — its humor and pain and emotional demand — as perfectly as his skill with color. “There’s essentially some refined times in some of the lesser parts that I observed myself sort of caught on,” claimed Nordin, who was struck by Solien’s use of the coloration yellow.

T.L. Solien, “The Renunciation 2,” 2015. Acrylic and enamel on canvas, 72 by 96 inches.

Courtesy of Nemeth Artwork Center

“I normally enjoy heading to the Nemeth Artwork Center,” added Bergh, “You enter into the room as a result of the [Hubbard County] Historical Museum with tons of artifacts, which even produced a lot more sense when you walk [up the big stairs] into Solien’s work, for the reason that the exhibit is just designed on all these artifacts of his personal historical past of society.”

T.L. Solien’s display operates by July 17, with a closing reception on July 10 at 4 p.m.


Claude and Laurel Riedel of Minneapolis love the Boundary Waters Canoe Location Wilderness, and they recommend a children’s photograph e-book penned and illustrated by Ely people, about a familiar scene throughout wildfire year.

A plane is pictured on a book cover

“Big Yellow: Firefighting Celebrity,” written by Polly Carlson-Voiles and illustrated by Consie Powell

Courtesy Legacy Certain

The ebook is “Big Yellow: Firefighting Celebrity,” penned by Polly Carlson-Voiles and illustrated by Consie Powell. 

The Riedels have a own connection to the story. Even though on a tenting trip near Trout Lake some decades in the past with the author and her husband, they noticed smoke from a forest fireplace. The two Claude and Laurel vividly try to remember the major yellow plane that arrived swooping down to the lake in entrance of them, scooped up drinking water, and then climbed up over the treeline with its major load to go fight the hearth. 

Instantly, they turned to Carlson-Voiles with a advice: “You have to publish a story about this,” explained Laurel.  “Kids will appreciate this. We are loving it as grownups.” 

The photo ebook was printed this year by Minnesota-centered Legacy Sure. The Riedels say their grandchildren, ages 7 and 10, love examining about how planes are designed and applied to battle forest fires. Of the Ely-dependent illustrations, Laurel Riedel claims “Big Yellow looks just like I try to remember her, just a little friendlier.”

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