The Countrywide Museum of Puerto Rican Arts and Society in Chicago slash some programming but retained its little staff members in the course of the pandemic.

National Museum of Puerto Rican Arts and Tradition


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Nationwide Museum of Puerto Rican Arts and Lifestyle


The Countrywide Museum of Puerto Rican Arts and Society in Chicago slash some programming but retained its smaller staff through the pandemic.

Countrywide Museum of Puerto Rican Arts and Tradition

Billy Ocasio feels like one particular of the country’s luckier museum directors. He runs the Countrywide Museum of Puerto Rican Arts and Society, however standing solid in Chicago immediately after the pandemic wiped out dozens of little museums across the region.

“About 33% of our running budget was dropped,” he tells NPR. His small museum slash programming but not its a few full-time staff members. “I’m grateful that we did not have to lay off anyone, to hold everybody used.”

The Chicago museum arrived out ahead, according to a new review from the American Alliance of Museums. Of the 1,000 museum administrators it surveyed, 3-quarters documented their functioning incomes fell by an average of 40% in 2020. And 50 % claimed their total staff dimensions experienced lessened by an ordinary of 29% as opposed with pre-pandemic concentrations. (This range provided voluntary departures, these kinds of as retirements.) Only 44% program to rehire or enhance their workers dimensions in the coming yr.

Museums are a lot more than wonderful sites to shell out an afternoon, states Laura Lott, president and CEO of the American Alliance of Museums. “Museums are economic engines,” she tells NPR. “Pre-pandemic they contributed above $50 billion to the U.S. [gross domestic product]. They used about a few-quarters of a million people today ” — as numerous as the aviation marketplace — “and they are often the tourist desired destination in towns huge and tiny.”

She points out that as properly as obtaining to juggle harmony sheets and consider to help save employees employment — whilst getting rid of income from functions and university excursions — museum administrators have experienced to spend revenue in sanitizing and improving heating, ventilating and air conditioning programs, and generating other pricey improvements on tight margins. On common, museums expended about $300,000 on closing, getting ready to reopen and reopening in reaction to the pandemic. The common pandemic economic decline for every museum, in accordance to the research, was shut to $700,000 — and a good deal of museums weren’t in a position to slash plenty of to make up for that reduction.

In 2020, the American Alliance of Museums obtained a ton of consideration from another study predicting a 3rd of U.S. museums could completely close because of to the pandemic. Right now, about 85% of directors consider there is no important chance of their museum’s permanent closure in the next 6 months. But that leaves 15% of museums whose directors confirmed there was a “important risk of everlasting closure” or they “didn’t know” if they would survive the subsequent six months absent added money reduction.

Fifteen percent could possibly not audio like that lots of. But imagine 15% of the museums in your group closing. Which would you want to get rid of? Nationally, Lott claims, we’re talking about the loss of a lot more than 5,000 U.S. museums, every of them in some way a treasure.

This tale was edited for radio by Petra Mayer and tailored for the web by Neda Ulaby and Petra Mayer.