Mary Ellen Mark picked up her very first digicam at age 9, to start off her “life journey through images.” In a 50-yr career, the photojournalist would travel the entire world to photograph individuals of all ages and from all walks of lifestyle.

The National Museum of Women in the Arts, in “Mary Ellen Mark: Girlhood,” focuses on a single facet of her lifelong function with additional than 20 photos of young ladies from missed communities in the United States, India, Turkey, Mexico and the former Soviet Union.

As a photographer, Mark was most interested in children, stating that she did not photograph “children as children” but “as older people, as who they genuinely are. I’m often looking for the aspect of who they may possibly develop into.”

In one of Mark’s earliest works, “Emine Dressed Up for Republic Working day, Trabzon, Turkey” (1965), a youthful female faces the digital camera, a single hand put on her hip, the other by her pouting mouth. Unbuckled dirt-stained footwear and hair loosening from its bow are clues that Emine is impatient to develop up.

Mark does not construct a distinct narrative of girlhood. Her topics change from singing and dancing, putting on makeup or smoking. There are scenes of witnessing death or awaiting delivery. Is effective from some of Mark’s ideal-known collection are involved like “Ursula Phillips and Gregg Whitlock Jr., Malcolm X Shabazz Prom” (2006) from “Prom” or “Tashara and Tanesha Reese, Twins Times Festival, Twinsburg, Ohio” (1998) from her do the job “Twins.”