“I recorded it with Depend Basie in 4-4 time,” Jones recalled. “When he wrote it originally, he wrote in 3-four. [Singing] ‘Fly … me to the moon …’ A single, two, three, 1, two, a few. You just cannot swing in 3-4. Sinatra explained, ‘I like it the way you did it with Basie, the 4-4. Would you take into consideration performing that with me and him?’ I said, ‘Hell to the yeah!’ So I had to sit in my resort area in San Remo and overnight I experienced to generate that arrangement. No piano, nothing at all, just generate it. Frank died when he read it, male. I was so satisfied because, actually, that was my first matter for him. I was 29, you know? People fellas had been in their 50s and 60s.”

Jones also talked about his former next-door neighbor Elon Musk and his recent stint as the host of Saturday Night Are living. “He’s amusing. I’m happy he did it. What the f—, it exhibits he has a perception of humor. He was not hilarious, but he was humorous. At the very least his try was amusing.” Other subjects the now-88-year-previous musician protected in the job interview provided Elvis Presley, experiencing racism in the movie industry, and very last year’s Black Life Subject protests.

The interview kicks off the “THR Icons” sequence, which will set a spotlight on Hollywood legends. “It’s tricky to overstate the effects that Quincy Jones has had, not just on songs and Hollywood, but pop culture,” Nekesa Mumbi Moody, editorial director of The Hollywood Reporter, stated in a push launch announcing the collection. “He’s developed music that has been element of the soundtrack for several generations, broken down racial boundaries and established a blueprint for other folks to stick to. He is the perfect individual to launch our new series, celebrating the trailblazers who helped make a big difference in the field.”

Read through Jones’ whole interview below.