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Robert Martinez has had a whirlwind year.

SAGE Gallery in Sheridan provided his artwork in “Creative Indigenous Collective: A Collecting Exhibition,” from June 8-July 17. His 1-man display at the Brinton Museum in Large Horn opened July 10 and proceeds via Sept. 5. His month-extensive residency at Mad Horse Memorial in the Black Hills finished July 30.

On Aug. 2, he headed into a 5-working day residency at the Plains Indian Museum at Buffalo Bill Heart of the West in Cody. The gig, which he has had the last two many years, provides time and house for him  to paint and talk with museum goers. Into the drop, he will be in team reveals throughout the West.

The Riverton native requires it all in with a grin and a giggle. Even when he spends a month in a motel without having air conditioning.

Martinez is embracing 2021 with its non-cease calendar of situations and exhibits, workshops and outreach. Past yr the pandemic shut down the typical summer months time of displays and art venues: a working artist’s bread and butter. Ever adaptable, Martinez didn’t hold out for COVID-19 to go away. Instead, the 44 year aged figured out to navigate social media and Zoom sessions, and ongoing to forge forward with his special artwork.

‘I get a large amount of questions’

Like other Northern Arapaho youth rising up on the Wind River Reservation, Martinez likely was not confident what chances would open up to him . Immediately after attending St. Stephens Indian Faculty — the moment a Catholic mission university, now operated by the Arapaho tribe with funding from Wyoming and the Bureau of Indian Training — Martinez graduated from Riverton Large Faculty in 1994. A teacher, Brendon Weaver, nudged him toward a serious art occupation.

Artist Robert Martinez. (Connie Wieneke)

“Mr. Weaver used for scholarships in my identify,” he stated. “I bought 4 whole rides. I was stunned.”

The 17 year previous chose Rocky Mountain College or university of Artwork & Layout in Denver “because it was absent from my family members, but even now shut.” He fast-tracked the courses in a few several years and arrived back to the reservation in 1997 to begin Martinez Structure & Art.

But he speedily discovered staying a whole-time artist was not practical.

“It’s a myth that somebody will find you and put you in a gallery and you will make a lot of revenue,” he said.

Just after he bought his current overall body of operate to good friends and family members, “which weren’t quite a few,” he remembers, he had to get a work. For a few several years he did building to help his family members, but eventually turned to instruction and system management for the Northern Arapaho and a Fremont County faculty district. His forte: performing with at-chance youth on the reservation, encouraging them to get a leg up on the 21st century.

Whilst those careers supported his relatives for a decade, Martinez never ever stopped drawing or wielding his airbrush to layer on paint.  When nonetheless operating for Fremont County, he was employed to paint a number of murals showcasing Arapaho leaders in hallways and in a gymnasium.

Given that offering up his day work opportunities, Martinez has garnered awards and kudos as his creative profile rose. His wife, graphic artist Veronica Martinez, joined in the residence-primarily based small business in 2003 and brought her indigenous Mexican imagery to the design company and for clients, like Wind River Lodge & On line casino.

Robert Martinez won the 2019 Governor’s Arts Award for visible artwork. Also a recipient of a Wyoming Arts Council visible arts fellowship, his paintings and re-envisioned ledger artwork had been amid people showcased in a 2018-19 biennial exhibit, “Land and System,” at the University of Wyoming Art Museum.

“4 Arapaho Leaders,” just one of his signature ledger paintings, was ordered in 2015 by the Smithsonian Museum for its long term selection. A facsimile of an 1885 Arapaho Census Ledger delivers the backdrop for this artwork and information the tally of indigenous individuals on the reservation: 883. The Arapahos now variety more than 10,000.

That motif — the ledger paper, previous map or document — has grow to be a person of Martinez’s signatures. “I wished to use the history,” he claimed.

The process references historic ledger artwork. Soon after the slaughter of bison and the elimination of tribes to reservations, Plains Indians like the Northern Arapaho resorted to applied ledger paper to report or commemorate an celebration, these types of as a hunt or fight, according to art historians. It was much more file than artwork. The paper was accessible and cheap, contrary to the no-for a longer period-offered buffalo hides or linen canvas.

“I think an artist evolves,” Martinez explained, “pushes the limits.”

Barbara McNab, curator of exhibitions at the Brinton Museum, pointed out that Martinez absolutely has. “It’s a incredibly modern perspective by a Northern Arapaho,” she explained of his artwork. “The operate is effective. He has an unusual colour palette.”

Hatter, by Robert Martinez, is element of a summer 2021 solo exhibition at the Brinton Museum in Large Horn. (Courtesy)

Non-native artists primarily present a romanticized graphic of Native peoples, Martinez stated, depicting them as out-of-day and devoid of a foreseeable future. In a phrase, dead. 

Martinez can take a diverse tack and provides the viewpoint of a present day Northern Arapaho. For him, this suggests pairing clashing shades, like vibrant yellow with a pulsing blue, or a deep purple with brick pink. By overlaying his pretty practical portraits with these vibrant colors, Martinez needs to problem the prevailing picture offered in galleries and museums.  

“Even (photographer) Edward Curtis jazzed them up,” he explained, referring to the iconic sepia-toned images. These visuals normally function a stoic or sad Indian searching off into a faded past. Martinez usually takes issue with that level of perspective, choosing vivid acrylics and oils for his even larger-than-daily life portraits.

“Some individuals believe Indians and they assume teepees, feathers and horses,” Martinez said. Rather he provides up family members, hip-hop artists, rocket riders, roller-skaters, Military troopers, on line casino operators, women of all ages boxers, philosophers, cell cellphone addicts and Captain Native American.

He’s excited about public art commissions he has obtained, he explained, which offer you an option to share this extra nuanced eyesight of Indigenous American lifetime. This consists of one from Montana State College. He is painting two 9’ by 9’ murals, just about every featuring a solid present-day Indigenous American girl. While at Mad Horse Memorial he was doing work up drawings: a person of an engineering pupil. It portrays a self-assured younger girl, a roll of drawings tucked underneath her white shirted arms, a tricky hat protected to her head, eyes that do not convert away from the future.

“If you are on the lookout at a portray of a human being and they are on the lookout back again at you,” Martinez mentioned, “there’s some communication there.”

To get people’s consideration, he wears interesting hats. It’s really hard to overlook him: very long black hair curls down his back, a tidy beard graces his decreased face, brown eyes obstacle. There is that delicate voice that makes you pay attention. Listed here is a person firmly embedded in Wyoming, with a mixed heritage of Arapaho, Mexican, Spanish and Scotch-Irish.

“I do not truly glance indigenous,” Martinez mentioned. “I’ve got the beaded hat, the prolonged hair. I am form of pudgy, very light-weight pores and skin. I get a lot of inquiries. Are you the artist? Are you Native American? Most of the general public is so conditioned by stereotypes (of Indians), through Hollywood and the media.”

His quite modern art has no put for so-termed passionate visuals that harken back again to some “good aged times.” And it’s men and women he is most fascinated in, not landscapes, however an occasional deer or raven wanders into see.

Bridging cultures

Even as museums and collectors acquire his operate, Martinez has not place apart his determination to give again to the community. His artwork also seeks to create interaction and appreciation involving non-Natives and Indigenous cultures.

To that stop, Martinez has been involved with Wyoming’s go towards together with Native American perspectives in the state’s mandated core curriculum. Buffalo Bill’s Native Education Outreach Specialist Heather Bender highlighted him in just one of the teacher talks for this much more inclusive approach.

Robert Martinez discusses his operate at the Insane Horse Memorial in South Dakota. (Connie Wieneke)

“His talk was referred to as ‘Adjusting Expectations,’” Bender stated. “That’s him in a nutshell. He allows you see that Indigenous people are aspect of the right here and now. He understands the importance of giving voice and having company, in particular for yourself. He was actually fantastic at communicating with teachers.”

Advocating for Indigenous Us citizens has been a central part of Martinez’s lifetime. In 2012 he co-started the Northern Arapaho Artist Modern society with Ron Howard, Bruce Prepare dinner, and Eugene Ridgebear, with help from Initial Peoples Fund. He also encouraged the Wyoming Arts Council to present Indigenous Arts Fellowships, the to start with of which were being awarded this 12 months.

When you walk into a Martinez exhibit expecting to see another elegy to the passing of Native People in america, you are going to be upset. These are not dirges for a useless men and women, not reduce-outs or stereotypes. He asks you to look into their deep eyes, to enable them seem into yours.

“It’s like increasing your hand in a place and indicating ‘I am below,’” McNab stated.

In the video clip generated by the Plains Indian Museum as aspect of Wyoming’s Education For All initiative, Martinez summed it up: “My hope is we come across a far better knowledge of each individual other. Sense free to attain out.”

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