Paper historically has been a car for art, supporting paintings, drawings and additional. In a outstanding exhibit at the Ohio Craft Museum, paper — in a wide range of incarnations — is the art. 

“Crossover: Developments in Paper” offers 42 inventive performs by 11 artists — many of them from Larger Columbus — who use equally professional and handmade paper in surprising and impressive ways.

Julie McLaughlin of Coralville, Iowa, established a spectacular large kimono of handmade papers dyed in shades of blue and green. 

Susan Byrd of Anacortes, Washington, continues the topic with her “Shifu Haori,” a coat worn over a kimono, that she built totally of paper, such as the thin brown thread used to assemble and enhance the piece. The coat seems and feels like linen and defies viewers to think that it was certainly built of paper.

In a few performs from her sequence “Mountains to Climb,” Susan Li O’Connor of Powell, Ohio, considers interactions concerning the United States and other nations around the world as nicely as the ongoing stress among Taiwan and China. Employing American and Chinese newspapers, she has fashioned 1000’s of very small rolls that are assembled to generate standing sculptures of a hard terrain of hills. 

"Accretion in Black" by Julie M. Abijanac

Cuba was on the head of Columbus artist Laura Alexander when she established “Cascade,” intricately slash geometric models which, she wrote in her artist statement, was impressed by the colors and patterns of the country.

Ann Corley Silverman of Columbus dug into the 1930s Federal Writers’ Project to obtain slave stories. In six shadowboxes, her “Slave Narratives and Old Lace” include handmade paper, lace and hundreds of scrolls with the names of all those telling the stories.